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To proclaim the truth about humanity in a subjectivist culture

February 13, 2007

Coincidentally, I just found out news on Pope Benedict’s address to a delegation of French intellectuals to whom he urged to live truth amidst cultural subjectivism, which is in the same spirit of the previous post on Personalism and two French intellectuals of their time, Mounier and Maritain, who sought truth in the midst of what they considered to be the fall of civilization and of modern man in the early 20th century.

The Pope made this address to a group of delegates from the Academy of Moral and Political Sciences, that the Pope considered to be a place that helps “find forms of political organization that are more favorable to the common good and to the development of the individual.”

The Pope said “both in personal and public life, it is necessary to have the courage to say the truth and follow it, and to be free from one’s environment, which in general tends to impose points of view and behaviors.” He also characterized the subjectivism in which we find ourselves in as “Each person tends to take himself as the only reference point and considers that what he thinks has the character of truth.”

Pope Benedict XVI calls us to stop detaching ourselves from the Creator and to return to God and to understand the human person and his relation to the world in the context as first being created by God, “we must have the courage to remind our contemporaries what the person is and what humanity is.”

Only with a conscience formed with fundamental values centered in the human person can one seek the truth of humanity and that without them, humanity as a whole is in danger with which the Pope concluded, “civil authorities and those people who have a role in the transmission of values to always maintain the courage to proclaim the truth about humanity.”

Source: Zenit
For the complete text of the Pope’s message, click here (only available in Italian and French).
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